Hawaii Plantation Village celebrates the Malunggay Festival

Posted on March 31, 2016


Remembering back to the thousands of Filipino immigrants and families who came to work on the Sugar Plantation in Old Waipahu. A strong hard working group of people, who left there mark in the land and the stone of the Hawaii Sugar Mill, Plantations.

Welcome to Waipahu

A welcome sign on a rock wall, that has stood for more than a century, the stones were hand cut and laid by Filipino Stone Mason’s, like Andres Cuison in the early days of Plantation life in Waipahu. Filipino Male immigrants were know as Sakadas

This Saturday April 2, 2016 – come and travel back in time and enjoy music, culture, and the richness of Hawaii’s Filipino Heritage and filipino food at the August Ahrens’ Malunggay Festival.  Starting with a parade through out Old Waipahu Town and ending the celebration at August Ahrens & the Hawaii Plantation Village,  the Malunggay Festival highlights a variety of filipino ethnic food, products, and other activities that can be enjoyed from  10am to 5 pm.

 

Kalamungay Tree used in many dishes and recipes

Kalamungay Tree used in many dishes and recipes


 

Filipino’s are know for their ability to use a wide variety of leaves and vegetables to create tasteful dishes, the Kalamungay  tree is a favorite in many filipino recipes. The leaves and the vegetables know as the “Malunggay Fruit” will be the showcase of dishes served during the August Ahrens’ Malunggay Festival.

Kalamungay leaves & Fruit  used in many dishes and recipes

Kalamungay leaves & Fruit used in many dishes and recipes

Filipino Purses hand woven

Filipino Purses hand woven

Filipino Zabatos  - a type of Sandal made in the Native Country and brought to Hawaii

Filipino Zabatos – a type of Sandal made in the Native Country and brought to Hawaii

Filipino Hat used  by laborers for Shade in  the Plantation Fields

Filipino Hat used by laborers for Shade in the Plantation Fields

Sakada's or Male Filipino laborers who migrated from the Philippines, work the fields of Ewa and did other manual labor on the Waipahu Sugar Plantation

Sakada’s or Male Filipino laborers who migrated from the Philippines, work the fields of Ewa and did other manual labor on the Waipahu Sugar Plantation

Andres Cuison - a Filipino Stone Cutter & Mason at the Waipahu Sugar Plantation

Andres Cuison – a Filipino Stone Cutter & Mason at the Waipahu Sugar Plantation

Stones were cut by the Sakada's like Andres Cuison and laid without any cement. The Walls can still be seen boarding along Waipahu and have held up for more than a century.

Stones were cut by the Sakada’s like Andres Cuison and laid without any cement. The Walls can still be seen boarding along Waipahu and have held up for more than a century.

Watch our Pathways to Paradise TV Show tonight as we highlighted the Hawaii Plantation Village and Old Waipahu at 8:30 pm on Olelo Channel 55 or live-stream CH55 at the Olelo.org page. Along with our highlight of Old Waipahu we also featured the University of Hawaii Cancer Research Center – “Breast Cancer & Prostate Cancer” event. With a dialogue of a team of Doctors talking about the importance of early check ups for Prostate & Breast Cancer, self exams, helping family members to cope, eating Healthy with vegetables like the Kalamungay Leaves and Fruits and other variety of whole foods and exercise.

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